Is Personal Training Outdated?

Throughout the last few years, a number of different fitness and weight loss programs have popped up. Some of which could potentially replace or enhance the classic one-hour personal training session we are all so familiar with. A few critics even say that the regular 1-On-1 personal training session is outdated. I disagree. I’ve lived and breathed this industry for the past fifteen years and I’ve seen quite a lot of these new developments in the field of personal training.

You can get a lot of things done in one hour of personal training. It’s great for people who are really focused, have medical issues, athletes, and the advanced client.

A couple of years ago the 30 min training session was introduced. This shorter and less expensive session made it possible for less affluent people to experience the benefits of a personal trainer and enabled them to achieve a fitness level beyond what they thought possible. Critics out there claim that it’s not possible to accomplish any lasting fitness effects in that short a time. Again, I disagree. Many of my clients make tremendous progress with just 30-minute sessions. With proper diet, a good warm up before your personal training session as well as a stretching/cool down routine on your own, this “Quickie” can do wonders and your trainer can show you how. If you do some cardio training afterward you easily train longer than one-hour training.

In the last years, small-group personal training has been on the rise. Instead of working one client for one hour trainers will work with 3-6 clients at the same time. This form has proven to be highly effective with clients that have similar goals and levels of training, especially in the weight loss sector since group motivation and bonding increase the likelihood of success.

Boot Camps are the latest development and the most affordable one. It offers great training to a lot of people who can cheer each other on and keep each other accountable while still having a qualified trainer supervising the sessions. Naturally, there is less 1-on-1 time with the trainer, so it only works for people who don’t have any medical issues or other special needs.

Other fun-sounding forms of exercise have also made an appearance, things like Pole Dancing or Jazzercise etc. And while they have their benefits, they can’t deliver the kind of targeted workouts that personal training can. The key to success is to have a well-balanced conditioning program that challenges your strength, your cardiovascular ability as well as flexibility. Restricting it to one form of training like working just on a pole or just using dance as exercise will neglect muscle groups that are of importance. These exercises still are a valuable addition to your training but should not replace a well-balanced cardio and strength training routine.